Tinkering: VIII - Voila c'est une navette

Colorado Boat Shuttle

Ash wood + Urethane Resin

Through the design work, research, and tinkering, I have learned a lot in this project.  It has given me the chance to experiment with 3D Sketch tools and surface features.  I have learned a lot about digital fabrication (even though I didn't get the chance to fabricate, myself).

What's next?

Mess around more with materiality

Master the loft tool

FABRICATE

 A reversed material sceme

A reversed material sceme

 (Not as nice)

(Not as nice)

Tinkering: VII - Tonight I Hungout With Some Models

I'm finally at the point where I can get into modeling in Solidworks.

I ran into several road bumps through this modeling process.  For example, when it came to modeling the bottom plate of the shuttle body, every extrusion method I tried would not accomplish the contours and form that I desired.  What I ended up doing was constructing a 3D Sketch and then filling it with surfaces to resemble a solid.  Further tinkering with the loft and extrusion tools may reveal just what I need to create a truly solid part.

 Early model of the shuttle body

Early model of the shuttle body

 Revolving the bobbin sketch

Revolving the bobbin sketch

 Assembled and exploded

Assembled and exploded

Tinkering: V - Hands on a Shuttle

I drew from a friendly neighborhood fibers major and was able to get my hands on a generic boat shuttle that students use to weave.

 It felt a bit clunky and was not comfortable in the hand

It felt a bit clunky and was not comfortable in the hand

From this shuttle, I was able to actually look at the basic mechanics of the object.  I could determine that the bobbin rests on a rod that is spring loaded inside the void.  I was able to collect measurements from specific attributes that typically were not on manufacturer's websites.

 The lifts at each end were unusual

The lifts at each end were unusual

Shortly after receiving the shuttle, I ran into another friendly fibers major and we had a super good talk about improvements that could be made to the shuttle form.  Her main gripe was that these shuttles, although rather pricey, felt really cheap and she would love to see well crafted, exotic wooden shuttles.  My goal is not to produce a completely wooden shuttle, but I think I could definitely deliver on the exotic wood request.  Cocobolo is known to have some "sexy" grain.

Being able to put hands on one of these objects was incredibly helpful.  How could I have designed an object I had never touched before?

Tinkering: III - Stick Shuttle Hiatus

Although a boat shuttle is the outcome I'm working towards, I thought I would have a little fun with the laser cutter and make a simple stick shuttle before getting into the big design work.

 Various sizes of stick shuttles

Various sizes of stick shuttles

There isn't much to a stick shuttle other than the slots cut out for the filling string to go.  Some stick shuttles have a bevel on one of the edges to provide another tool for tightening the weave.

Here We Go...

 Drawing it up in Solidworks

Drawing it up in Solidworks

Rendering the model in Keyshot

The file has been sent to the laser cutter and now I wait for the product.

Tinkering: II - What the heck is a shuttle?

  This is a shuttle.

This is a shuttle.

  This is also a shuttle, but not for my purposes.

This is also a shuttle, but not for my purposes.

shut·tle

[shuht-l]

noun

a device in a loom for passing or shooting the weft thread through the shed from one side of the web to the other, usually consisting of a boat shaped piece of wood containing a bobbin on which the weft thread is wound.

A VIDEO BREAKDOWN OF SHUTTLE TYPES

This video was a great tool because I didn't have a clue that there were different types of shuttles for different operations.  With that being said, it looks like the boat shuttle is what I want to pursue and expand upon.

Another great resource for type descriptions and details is here.

Another problem is posed: which mechanism will the filling string be loaded on?  The most commonly used tool is a bobbin that is 4 in. long.

Typical Shuttle Dimensions:

Length: 10.5 - 14 in.

Width: 1.5 - 3 in.

Depth: 1 - 2 in.

i.e. 11.5 in. long shuttle for 4 in. bobbin

What next?

Time to concept and sketch.

Things to consider: bobbin space, curvature of shuttle, lifts at either end, ergonomics, and materiality.